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PATHWAY IN2MED Alternative Pathways

Didn't Get an Offer?

I didn't get an offer. What do I do?

Offers to study medicine are released throughout January, February and March – coinciding with the offer rounds stipulated by the relevant state tertiary application bodies (VTAC, UAC, QTAC, etc).

The majority of offers are released in the first round, and subsequent offers are often made to international/interstate applicants and filling vacant spots from previous offer rounds.

If you are not offered a place into medical school in the offer rounds, it is okay to feel upset or disappointed, but understand that this is only a minor setback. Feel free to talk with friends, family and other members of your support network.

There are a number of ways to enter medical school despite not receiving an offer; however, it is important to be willing to commit and put the work in to do so. Resilience despite setbacks is an essential trait amongst healthcare professionals and by dedicating another year (or more) to gain entry into medical school undoubtedly shows such resilience.

Students who didn't get into undergraduate medicine who still have time to apply again

Your Options

What are my options?

'Sufficient' ATAR (Generally above 99) + 'Sufficient' UCAT (Generally above 90th percentile)
Interview most likely prevented selection. Consider taking a gap year, redoing the UCAT and applying for a number of universities (if your first preference doesn’t allow multiple interview attempts).
'Sufficient' ATAR (Generally above 99) + 'Insufficient' UCAT (Generally below 90th percentile)
Consider taking a gap year to sit the UCAT again – you may wish to redo some Year 12 subjects too boost your ATAR (if applicable in your state) but this may not be necessary.
'Insufficient' ATAR (Generally below 99) + Any UCAT Score
If your ATAR was far below the high 90s and you can’t see it improving much beyond this, it may be advisable to start another undergraduate university course and attempt graduate medical entry down the track. If you have reason to believe that you can score a 99+ ATAR and will implement different strategies, redoing year 12 and retaking the UCAT is an option. (Note: Your UCAT score is only valid for 1 year, so you will have to retake it regardless of the score you got before)
'Sufficient' ATAR
(Generally above 99)
'Insufficient' ATAR
(Generally below 99)
'Sufficient' UCAT
(Generally above 90th percentile)
Interview most likely prevented selection. Consider taking a gap year, redoing the UCAT and applying for a number of universities (if your first preference doesn’t allow multiple interview attempts).If your ATAR was far below the high 90s and you can’t see it improving much beyond this, it may be advisable to start another undergraduate university course and attempt graduate medical entry down the track. If you have reason to believe that you can score a 99+ ATAR and will implement different strategies, redoing year 12 and retaking the UCAT is an option.
'Insufficient' UCAT
(Generally below 90th percentile)
Consider taking a gap year to sit the UCAT again – you may wish to redo some Year 12 subjects too boost your ATAR (if applicable in your state) but this may not be necessary.

Option 1 - Redoing the UCAT and/or ATAR:

The UCAT is only relevant for the year that you sit it, whereas the ATAR is valid for 2 years. Therefore, if you decide to attempt undergraduate medical entry again, you will need to re-sit the UCAT regardless of whether you did well or not. 

As there is much more time to prepare for the UCAT and due to the experience gained from the previous year, students tend to perform much better on the UCAT second time round, especially if they take a gap year.

If you believe your ATAR is insufficient, you can redo Year 12 and the ATAR, or redo/complete new subjects (depending on your state). In the VCE, if you receive a lower study score upon redoing a subject, your initial (higher) study score will still be counted towards you aggregate and ATAR.

NOTE: most universities do not allow candidates to complete an interview again and will use the previous score for the interview (completed the year before) when ranking candidates.

Option 2 - Starting a university course (graduate entry):

Once you begin an undergraduate course, your ATAR essentially becomes redundant.

You can pick ANY undergraduate course to study prior to applying for postgraduate medicine. However, generally, students choose to study a science, biomedical or pharmacy course as their undergraduate degree (all of which are related to medicine).

In order to select medical students via the graduate pathway, universities rank applicants based on their:

  1. Scores throughout university (GPA)
  2. GAMSAT score
  3. Interview (offers based on the previous 2 criteria)

IMPORTANT!

If you have commenced an undergraduate course (with or without the intent of attempting graduate medical entry), you CANNOT apply for undergraduate medical entry at MONASH UNIVERSITY (VIC) again

Therefore, if you want to try for undergraduate entry again, you must take a gap year to redo the UCAT and/or the ATAR. 

Graduate Entry

Applying to Universities for Medicine

Which universities offer graduate medical courses?

Universities that offer medicine as a graduate course include:

  • Australian National University (NSW)
  • Deakin University (VIC)
  • Griffith University (QLD)
  • Macquarie University (NSW)
  • The University of Melbourne (VIC)
  • The University of Notre Dame (Fremantle) (WA)
  • The University of Notre Dame (Sydney) (NSW)
  • The University of Queensland (QLD)
  • The University of Western Australia (WA)
  • Wollongong University (NSW)

In2Med specialises in undergraduate medicine entry so if you would like further info or have other questions relating to graduate entry, visit the GEMSAS (www.gemsas.edu.au)

GAMSAT

GAMSAT = Graduate Medical School Admissions Test

The GAMSAT generally takes place in September, and is a test that takes approximately 6 hours to complete, with 3 different sections.

At In2Med, we do not currently offer any resources to help you prepare for the GAMSAT, but for more detailed information on the GAMSAT, visit the official GAMSAT website here.

GAMSAT

GAMSAT = Graduate Medical School Admissions Test

The GAMSAT generally takes place in September, and is a test that takes approximately 6 hours to complete, with 3 different sections.

At In2Med, we do not currently offer any resources to help you prepare for the GAMSAT, but for more detailed information on the GAMSAT, visit the official GAMSAT website here.

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